23 thoughts on “Sample Photos from the Nikon Coolpix P600 Camera

    1. Alex White Post author

      Hi — I assume you’re talking about the first image, of the bird on the fence. That was taken with the Bird-watching setting, with the lens zoomed in to 1440mm, at f/6.5 with a shutter speed of 1/60 second and ISO 450. The Matrix metering mode was used.

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  1. Manish

    HI Alex

    Can we make the background in the 1st image of a bird more blur by using Nikon P600? Because the background is not blur enough to divert our attention towards the object(bird). It distracts and irritates eyes. Please suggest.

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  2. Manish

    HI Alex

    can you provide camera settings you have used for all the Nikon P600 sample photos? This will help us understanding better about the camera settings and its effect(resultant photo).

    Thanks
    Manish

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    1. Alex White Post author

      Hi, Manish — I took a look at the various bird photos on the sample photos page for the P600 camera, and I think I see what you mean. In the first photo, the background is more distracting than for the other bird photos. I don’t think there would be an easy way to use different settings for that photo to get the background more blurred; the image was taken using a very long focal length, which caused a good deal of blurring of the background. I think the issue with that photo is that the background itself is somewhat distracting, with its bright highlights that contrast with the dark green areas. I think the background would have looked better and less distracting if it were more uniform in color.

      –Alex

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  3. Eman

    Hi! I find your page was very useful. I wanted to get the ebook on iTunes but it was not made available in Malaysian store sadly. Keep up the good work =)

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    1. Alex White Post author

      You use the zoom lever to set the focal length, according to the distance from your subject and the angle of view you are interested in. If the main subject is far away, you may want to zoom the lens in so the subject will be magnified enough to see it clearly. If you want to have a wide view of a room or a landscape, you will need to zoom the lens back out to its wide-angle position.

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  4. melreese

    Hello
    can this same or similar effect be done on the Coolpix L850 ? If so, could I get some information on how to do that? I need to shoot some photos with a blurred background. Thank you so much.

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    1. Alex White Post author

      Hello — I couldn’t find any information on the Coolpix L850, so I’ll answer for the L840. I haven’t worked with that model, but I understand that it does not have shooting modes such as Aperture Priority or Manual, which you would use in order to set a wide aperture to blur the background. What you can do, though, is use a fairly long focal length with the zoom lens, such as 400mm or higher, and get as close to the foreground subject as possible, with the background fairly far in the distance beyond the foreground subject. With that arrangement, the background should be blurred to a fairly good extent. To increase the blurring effect, use a longer focal length. Also, if you can control the lighting, try to have fairly dim lighting so the camera will use a wider aperture.

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  5. mohit

    hi Alex, i see you can take great pics , i always thought if i need to take such pics i have to use DSLR but now i know its possible from point n shoot cameras too, but that also makes me wonder in what respect we can give DSLR more advantage ?

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    1. Alex White Post author

      If you can be a bit more specific with your question, I’ll respond if I can. I’m not sure I will have a great answer, because I work mostly with point-and-shoot cameras and am not that familiar with the larger models.

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  6. Dave Preston

    How do you know / set what the ISO settings are and set Matrix metering method when using Birdwatching scene mode? All I see is shutter speed and aperture

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    1. Alex White Post author

      The Birdwatching setting is a setting in Scene mode, in which the camera controls most of the settings automatically. You cannot adjust settings like ISO and metering method in Scene mode. You would have to switch to a shooting mode like Program, Aperture Priority, Shutter Priority, or Manual if you want to control more settings. If you want to know what ISO setting the camera is using, you can take a picture and then check the ISO setting for that image in playback mode.

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  7. Dave Preston

    Thanks for the prompt response Alex. Ah, just taken a photo, switched to playback and pressed the Display button and sure enough it shows the ISO at 800. I thought you were showing the settings you had ‘chosen’ but I guess as you are in a scene mode you are telling us what the camera selected, so I guess you have zoomed and the camera did the rest? Did you ascertain the focal length as it was at maximum zoom and you know this is 1440, as all I see is 800mm until it gets to telephoto marker then nothing? The results I get in this mode at max zoom don’t seem as good as yours but lighting conditions may have been better; mine are hand held but I’m not sure if they would improve as they are consistent

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    1. Alex White Post author

      To tell what focal length was used, if the maximum focal length was used I would know that the value was 1440mm. Another way I can tell the focal length is by looking at the metadata in the software I use for managing my images. I generally use Adobe Bridge, though I sometimes use the Nikon software also.

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  8. Dave Preston

    That’s interesting, I didn’t realise this type of information was held in the JPG but I’ve just looked at the properties and sure enough it’s there – brilliant! Many thanks

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