Updates and Corrections

In each of my camera guide books, I state in the introductory notes that I will post updates and corrections to the books on this web site.  I do try to post updates whenever I come across a point that calls for clarification or correction. To assist in this effort, I appreciate it when readers  send me information that can clarify or correct the information in any of these books.

Photographer’s Guide to the Sony RX100 V

At page 39 of the printed version, the book says that, with the High Sensitivity setting of Scene mode, the camera takes only a single shot. As a reader has pointed out to me, this statement is true when the camera is using an ISO value of 3200 or lower. However, at higher ISO values, the camera takes a series of four shots and combines them internally in order to reduce noise.

Photographer’s Guide to the Sony RX10 III

On page 228 in Appendix A, in discussing flash units that work with the camera, I stated: “Another option is to use an older Sony flash that was not designed for the Multi Interface shoe. In that case, you need to get Sony’s shoe adapter, model number ADP-MAA, so the flash will work automatically with the RX10 III.” A reader has pointed out that not all older Sony flash units will work with Sony cameras that use the Multi Interface shoe, even with this adapter. In particular, he noted that the Sony HVL-F32X flash will not work with the Multi Interface shoe with any available adapter.

Starting at page 225 in Appendix A, I discussed several Sony remote controls that work with the RX10 III. I have recently discovered another remote that works with the camera and offers more options than the the Sony remotes. That is the Vello Shutterboss II. This remote can trigger the camera’s shutter and lock it down for a time exposure, and it also includes a self-timer that can be set to delay the shutter release for any interval from one second to 99 hours, 59 minutes, and 59 seconds. The Shutterboss II also can act as an intervalometer. You can set it to take a specific number of shots from one to 399, or to take an indefinite number of shots, at intervals from one second to 99 hours, 59 minutes, and 59 seconds.

The Shutterboss II is a very versatile control. Like the Sony remotes discussed in the book, this unit plugs into the Multi terminal on the left side of the camera. If you purchase one, you need to specify the version for Sony cameras that use the Multi terminal. I bought mine from B&H Photo Video for $49.95.

Photographer’s Guide to the Sony RX1R II

On page 206 in Appendix A, in discussing flash units that work with the camera, I stated: “Another option is to use an older Sony flash that was not designed for the Multi Interface shoe. In that case, you need to get Sony’s shoe adapter, model number ADP-MAA, so the flash will work automatically with the RX1R II.” A reader has pointed out that not all older Sony flash units will work with Sony cameras that use the Multi Interface shoe, even with this adapter. In particular, he noted that the Sony HVL-F32X flash will not work with the Multi Interface shoe with any available adapter.

Photographer’s Guide to the Sony RX10 II

On page 296 in Appendix A, in discussing flash units that work with the camera, I stated: “Another option is to use an older Sony flash that was not designed for the Multi Interface shoe. In that case, you need to get Sony’s shoe adapter, model number ADP-MAA, so the flash will work automatically with the RX10 II.” A reader has pointed out that not all older Sony flash units will work with Sony cameras that use the Multi Interface shoe, even with this adapter. In particular, he noted that the Sony HVL-F32X flash will not work with the Multi Interface shoe with any available adapter.

Photographer’s Guide to the Nikon Coolpix P900

In Chapter 7, Figure 7-7 is incorrect; it should include the option for Virtual Horizon on the Monitor Settings menu screen. In addition, the discussion of Monitor Settings in the text is incomplete; it does not explain the Virtual Horizon feature. That option, when activated, puts a virtual level on the screen. The level indicates whether the camera is tilted to the left or right or pitched forward or back. When the camera is level in both of those directions, the indicators on the level turn green. When the camera’s tilt sensor detects a tilt in the rolling (left to right) or pitching (forward and back) direction, the level displays a line that indicates the degree of roll or pitch. The Virtual Horizon feature is available only in certain situations, including when the camera is set to one of the PASM shooting modes and AF Area Mode is set to one of the Manual options. It also is available in certain Scene modes.

The earliest versions of this book mistakenly had a photo of the Coolpix P610 camera on the cover instead of the Coolpix P900. The interior of the book correctly discusses and illustrates the P900; it is only the cover photo that was incorrect.

Photographer’s Guide to the Nikon Coolpix P610

In Chapter 1, at page 6 of the printed book, shortly after Figure 1-6, in discussing the number of images that can be stored on a 32 GB SD card, the book says, “an 8 GB card can hold about 3900 still photos.” That passage should read, “a 32 GB card can hold about 3900 still photos.”

Photographer’s Guide to the Panasonic Lumix LX100

In Table 3-1, the block for how to set Aperture Priority mode has incorrect information. It should say, “Set shutter speed dial to the red A mark and set aperture ring to desired value.”

In Chapter 3, shortly after Figure 3-16, at page 36 in the PDF version, there is a reference to the camera’s lens being “fully zoomed in to the 90mm level.”  That should read: “fully zoomed in to the 75mm level.”

The above errors were caught early enough that I expect to be able to correct them before the printed book is published, and I will correct them in later versions of the ebooks. If anyone has an ebook with these errors and would like a corrected copy, please send an e-mail with that request to contact@whiteknightpress.com.

Photographer’s Guide to the Sony DSC-RX100 III

In some versions of the PDF file for this book, the lists of numbered steps have some incorrect numbers. For example, in Chapter 9, in the discussion of sending images to a computer, the step at the top of Page 418 should be step number 7, not step number 1. If you find that you have a PDF file with incorrect numbering in this or other lists of steps, please contact White Knight Press for a replacement file.

Photographer’s Guide to the Nikon Coolpix P600

At pages 380-382, in Appendix A, this book states that you cannot attach a filter directly to the lens of the P600 camera. A reader has pointed out that, in fact, the lens of the P600 is threaded to accept 52mm filters, and I found that I could attach a filter of that diameter to the front of the lens. I saw some slight vignetting in one or more of the corners of the image when I did this, and I am not certain that Nikon officially approves of attaching filters in this way. In addition, it can be slightly difficult to screw in the filter unless you first turn on the camera and extend the lens to make the threads more accessible. However, it clearly is possible to attach filters, and I have read reports indicating that some users of the camera have found it very useful to be able to do this with the P600.

At page 13 and at a few places in Chapter 9, the book states that movies cannot be transferred via the P600’s built-in Wi-Fi features. That statement is only partially correct. You cannot transfer movies using the Nikon Wireless Mobile Utility app for iPhone and iPad, but you can transfer movies via that app to an Android device, using the Android version of the WMU app.

Photographer’s Guide to the Sony DSC-RX10

In late August 2014, Sony released an update to the firmware of the RX10 camera. With this new version, 2.00, the camera gets a new video format, XAVC S, which provides higher quality than the existing AVCHD and MP4 formats. I discussed the addition of the new format in a blog post.

A reader pointed that, at page 13, I reversed the discussion of the front and back of the camera in describing how to insert a memory card. The last sentence on that page should read as follows: “You insert an SD card with its label pointing toward the front of the camera, as shown in Figure 1-10; insert a Memory Stick card with its label pointing toward the back of the camera.”

A reader raised a question about a passage on page 450 in Appendix A, where, in discussing flash units that work with the camera, I stated: “Another option is to use an older Sony flash that was not designed for the Multi Interface shoe. In that case, you need to get Sony’s shoe adapter, model number ADP-MAA, so the flash will work automatically with the RX10.” The reader pointed out that not all older Sony flash units will work with the RX10, even with this adapter. In particular, he said that the Sony HVL-F32X flash will not work with the RX10 with any available adapter.

Photographer’s Guide to the Fujifilm X100S

A reader has pointed out that, at page 109, I stated that the Film Simulation bracketing function causes the camera to take three pictures “in rapid succession,” when, in fact, the camera takes just one shot and uses its internal programming to produce three images with the three Film Simulation settings that have been chosen using the menu system. This process is described correctly at page 191.

Photographer’s Guide to the Sony DSC-RX100 II

When this book was published, Sony’s PlayMemories Home software was available only for Windows-based computers, not for Macintosh models. Since that time, Sony has released a version of this software for the Macintosh, though it does not have the full set of features contained in the Windows version. You can download PlayMemories Home for the Macintosh from the Sony site at http://www.sony.co.jp/imsoft/Mac/.

Photographer’s Guide to the Nikon Coolpix P520

A reader has advised that there is now another filter adapter available for the Coolpix P520 camera. The adapter is sold by lensadapters.co.uk. It appears to be a useful accessory, less bulky than the one described in the book at page 366. The reader said he bought one and found it to work well, so this is an item you might want to look into. The company sells the adapters on eBay, and says they ship quickly to the United States.

As of May 2014, Nikon has released a firmware upgrade for the P520, to version 1.1, to address two fairly minor bugs in the camera’s operation. I posted details about the upgrade in a blog post.

Photographer’s Guide to the Panasonic Lumix LX7

At page 390, the LX7 book discusses the Panasonic DMW-FL220 external flash unit, and says that one drawback to that flash is that its head does not rotate to allow you to bounce its light off a wall or ceiling. (The books about the LX5 and LX3 cameras make similar statements.) A reader advised me that Panasonic later offered a similar unit, the DMW-FL220E, which  has a head that does rotate and swivel. It appears that that version of the FL220 is available in the United Kingdom; I’m not sure if it’s readily available in the United States. However, another reader then advised me that that model actually does not have a movable head; he said that the specifications for the unit mention the angle of the flash beam, which might sound like an angle for tilt or swivel, but actually only concerns the angle of the beam.

Photographer’s Guide to the Sony DSC-RX100

When this book was published, Sony’s PlayMemories Home software was available only for Windows-based computers, not for Macintosh models. Since that time, Sony has released a version of this software for the Macintosh, though it does not have the full set of features contained in the Windows version. You can download PlayMemories Home for the Macintosh from the Sony site at http://www.sony.co.jp/imsoft/Mac/.

A reader has pointed out to me that the ePub version of the Sony RX100 book, which is available through the iBookstore from Apple and through this web site, had two of its images switched. Specifically, images 4-78 and 4-79 were inadvertently mixed up during the process of converting the book to the ePub format for the iPad and other devices that use that format.  If you purchased the ePub version that had those two images switched, please send an e-mail message to contact@whiteknightpress.com, and I will be happy to send you a link to download the corrected version of the ePub book.

Another reader has pointed out a problem with the suggested settings for movie recording at page 296.  The table of settings suggests setting Record Setting for movies to 60p 28M(PS) and Image Size (Dual Rec) to L:17M.  You can actually make those settings on the menu screen at the same time, but you cannot take a still image while you are recording a video with the Progressive setting listed in the table.  In other words, the listed settings can be made, but you can’t use all of them.  I would still recommend making the listed settings if you are shooting video and don’t plan to take any stills while recording the video.  If you plan to shoot stills, then you will need to select a different format for the video recording.

At page 271 of the Sony RX100 book, I noted that I could not figure out how to get the Demo Mode menu option to work, despite several calls and e-mail exchanges with Sony.  As of late July 2013, with the release of the RX100 II, Sony has clarified this option in the documentation for the new model. It turns out that, to get this feature to work, there is one additional step to take: You have to use the Protect option on the Playback menu to protect the AVCHD movie that you want the camera to play automatically in Demo mode.  So, to make the option work, you have to plug the camera in to AC power using the AC adapter, and then wait one minute without touching any controls.  At that point, the camera will start to play an AVCHD movie that you have protected. According to the documentation, the camera will play the protected AVCHD movie with the oldest shooting date and time.  I have tested this feature using these instructions, and I finally got this menu option to work.

Photographer’s Guide to the Nikon Coolpix P510

At Page 58, in the last full paragraph, line 6, after “well-lighted room,” the word “aperture” should be substituted for “shutter speed.”

Photographer’s Guide to the Panasonic Lumix LX5

Page 120, Multiple Exposure menu item. A reader pointed out that you can’t zoom the lens between the multiple exposures. You can adjust some other settings using the Quick Menu, and you could, of course, move the camera between shots, but the Zoom lever is disabled during the Multiple Exposure procedure.

Page 127, the first sentence under Flash says: “The Flash item on the Recording menu is available for adjustment only if the built-in flash is popped up or a compatible external flash unit is attached to the hot shoe.” That statement is not strictly correct. Actually, the Flash item on the menu can be adjusted whether or not a flash unit is attached or turned on. However, some settings will have no effect if there is no flash unit active. For example, if you select the Forced Flash On setting but don’t pop up or attach a flash unit, the camera will be set to Forced Flash Off, regardless of the menu setting.

Page 172, the Setup menu.  A reader pointed out that, if you enter the Setup menu from the Playback menu, you cannot get access to the Auto Power LCD setting; in order to use that setting, you have to enter the Setup menu from Recording mode.

For a general update to the book to deal with version 2.0 of the camera’s firmware, please click on this link to download the pdf file.

25 thoughts on “Updates and Corrections

  1. Richard Clarke

    Is it possible to get an extension lead for the external electronic viewfinder? Looks similar to a mini HDMI plug

    Reply
    1. Alex White Post author

      I have not heard of an extension cable or anything similar for the electronic viewfinder, though maybe someone else knows of one. I’ll try to dig around a little and see if I can find out anything.

      Reply
  2. Eddie

    Hi Alex,
    Saw your comments on the EVF. Though to write and ask if you know anyone making available a “macro light” that would fit over the LX5’s horse-shoe slot? Seems that a Olympus-accessories provider has such a gizmo ready, so though I ask. My limited understanding is that LX5’s physical horse-shoe slot is of a different dimension/size then Olympus’s. Not only that, the internal circuit pins that provides the power are also different.
    Thanks in advance.

    Reply
    1. Alex White Post author

      Hello, Eddie — No, I haven’t heard anything about a ring flash or ring light made specifically for the LX5 or that would be a particularly good fit. The Metz 15 MS-1 Ringlight is one that might work, though probably only in manual mode. I feel certain there are other options out there that could work, but I have not kept up with all developments in this area.

      Reply
  3. Eddie

    Thanks, Alex. Will consider that — though from initial quick look, seems a bit expensive (+/- USD400 from quick online search). 🙂 If you do spot a less pricy option, please do sound out. Cheers and keep writing great manuals, if you have time perhaps to expand links to matters regarding the LX-3/5/7(?) etc would be great too! 🙂

    Reply
  4. KK, HOO

    Hi! Alex, your “Photographer’s Guide to the Leica D-Lux 5” is simple and easy to understand for a newcomer in photography like me. An excellent and great manual to have in exploiting all the features of the camera! Just can’t leave home without either – camera and manual!

    Reply
  5. Jimmie Renzelman

    I simply wanted to send a small note so as to express gratitude to you for all the splendid pointers you are sharing here. My time-consuming internet lookup has now been compensated with really good tips to share with my close friends. I would tell you that most of us site visitors are undoubtedly lucky to live in a decent community with so many outstanding people with beneficial secrets. I feel very much fortunate to have discovered your entire webpages and look forward to many more awesome minutes reading here. Thanks a lot again for everything.

    Reply
  6. Mark

    Hi Alex,
    I have a PDF copy of your LX5 guide and have also downloaded the useful appendum about V 2.0 firmware. I would now like to purchase the hard copy of the LX5 guide for reasons of portability and wanted to enquire whether the V 2.0 appendum was now integrated in to the hard copy?
    Great guides by the way. I shall be buying my sister the Nikon P500 book for Christmas.
    Thanks in advance.

    Reply
    1. Alex White Post author

      Hello, Mark — Thanks for your message; I’m glad you have found the guides useful. In answer to your question, no, I have not incorporated the additional information about the version 2.0 firmware into the hard copy of the LX5 book. I can understand that it would be helpful to do that, but, at least at the moment, I have to focus on getting new books into production. Once things settle down a bit in a month or two, I might consider revising the LX5 book, but I can’t guarantee that I will, giving the complications involved in revising a printed book.

      –Alex

      Reply
  7. Justin Mackenzie

    I have just acquired the Photographer’s Guide to the Panasonic Lumix lx5 and note the observation about a dangling lens cap being a nuisance for some people. There is a brilliant product which addresses this issue but which amazingly no one seems to have thought of before. I have one but also have kept the lens cap string attached to avoid the risk of dropping the cap when removing it from the lens onto the holder. Go to:- http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/293194835/camera-lens-cap-holder AND http://www.cameracapholder.com/ AND http://photojojo.com/store/awesomeness/lens-cap-strap-holder/

    Another useful tool for the lx3, lx5 and leica dlux series is the ClearViewer which is a diopter attachment which assists shooting in bright sunlight and is effectively equivalent to using a camera with an optical viewfinder. Go to:- http://www.clearviewer.com
    The inventor will also make a version to suit a different camera if requested. I have found the ClearViewer viewfinder absolutely invaluable.

    Reply
  8. Dan Leigh

    About the Panasonic FL220E in the UK… I don’t think there ever was a version that tilted for bounce flash. Here’s an extract from a current live eBay item for sale:

    “The Panasonic DMW-FL220E Flashgun is a compact flashgun for Lumix digital cameras. It offers some bounce / swivel capability with lighting angle at 60 degrees up and down as well as 78 degrees left/right.”

    That 60 deg up-and-down and 78 deg left/right mentioned there as bounce and swivel capability is merely the spec for the fixed strobe’s angle of coverage.

    Such misunderstandings are likely to be the source of the incorrect information about the FL220E’s non-existent tilt.

    Best regards, DL

    ps: The Windows software for the RX100M3’s firmware update runs on XP SP3 without a hitch.

    Reply
    1. Alex White Post author

      Thanks for this clarification; it makes a lot of sense, and it looks as if your information clears up some confusion. I will change the discussion on the Updates and Corrections page to include your point.

      Reply
  9. John Sherrill

    I was told by nikon support that my coolpix p600 was not compatible with my kindle fire, but after downloading the wireless mobile utility app it works just fine.

    Reply
  10. Thomas Maney

    Not v important but I noted in your new book on the Sony RX 100 iv – the LCD is not labeled on the Back of Camera photo in Chapter 2.

    Reply
  11. raymond kelso

    I recently bought a Sony RX100iv and just discovered that it does hi speed video! Which SD card do you recommend? And does your RX100 iv cover video issues for the beginner ??

    Reply
    1. Alex White Post author

      I have had good experiences with the SanDisk 256 GB Extreme 80MB/s SDXC card, rated in UHS Speed Class 3. Another good card is the SanDisk Extreme PRO 64 GB card, rated in UHS Speed Class 1, if you don’t need to record with the 100 Mbps setting. Yes, I believe my book has the information a beginner needs for using the camera for video recording, in Chapter 8.

      Reply
  12. Barbara Mamlet

    Thanks for your most useful book on the Sony DSC-RX10 III. Is there any way to assign “live view” to one of the Control or other programmable buttons?

    Reply
    1. Alex White Post author

      I’m assuming you are talking about the Live View Display option on screen 3 of the Custom menu. No, for some reason Sony did not include that menu option as one of those that can be assigned to the Function menu or to one of the programmable control buttons.

      Reply

Leave a Reply